Dilgo Khyentse: Dzogchen Practice in Everyday Life

kaystoner:

The everyday practice of dzogchen is simply to develop a complete carefree acceptance, an openness to all situations without limit.

Originally posted on Engage!:

Dzogchen Practice in Everyday Life by HH Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

http://www.nyingma.com/dzogchen1.htm

The everyday practice of dzogchen is simply to develop a complete carefree acceptance, an openness to all situations without limit.

We should realise openness as the playground of our emotions and relate to people without artificiality, manipulation or strategy.

We should experience everything totally, never withdrawing into ourselves as a marmot hides in its hole.  This practice releases tremendous energy which is usually constricted by the process of maintaining fixed reference points.  Referentiality is the process by which we retreat from the direct experience of everyday life.

Being present in the moment may initially trigger fear.  But by welcoming the sensation of fear with complete openness, we cut through the barriers created by habitual emotional patterns.

When we engage in the practice of discovering space, we should develop the feeling of opening ourselves out completely to the…

View original 905 more words

Sit 350 in Boston Protests Rising Carbon Levels

kaystoner:

[Editor: The Buddhist response to climate change also has to include reducing the impact of Buddhism on the climate. Namely, practitioners can stop flying by air, chasing gurus around the globe, and flying to retreats in distant, exotic locales. Buddhists can give up their relative wealth which they have obtained at the expense of others who live in desperate poverty in those same exotic locales that they retreat to, otherwise known as developing nations. #decolonizebuddhism, #decarbonizebuddhism]
And the people said, “Amen”.

Originally posted on Engage!:

[Editor: The Buddhist response to climate change also has to include reducing the impact of Buddhism on the climate. Namely, practitioners can stop flying by air, chasing gurus around the globe, and flying to retreats in distant, exotic locales. Buddhists can give up their relative wealth which they have obtained at the expense of others who live in desperate poverty in those  same exotic locales that they retreat to, otherwise known as developing nations. #decolonizebuddhism, #decarbonizebuddhism]

Meditating in Public  December 03, 2014

Northeastern University students sit down to protest rising carbon levels. Joshua Eaton

As members of the Northeastern University Buddhist Group settled into their meditation cushions on Saturday, November 22, and found their breath, a biting wind blew through the green in Boston’s Copley Square. A golden, Thai-style Buddha sat in front of them, its jewelled robe catching the light off of John Hancock Tower. But this wasn’t just a street retreat or a…

View original 709 more words